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VHSL adopts model 3

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One of, keywords....."one of" the reasons some.....keyword "some" governor's may want to keep schools from reopening is political in nature. Kids at home means mom's can't get back to work. Kids at home means economic hardships for families and the economy.  Many people vote with their pockets and the Democratic party knows this. I will just say it.......some governor's are keeping some of the schools from reopening due to the hopes it hurtsTrump in the general election. Some o

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1 hour ago, UVAObserver said:

For the 742nd time...

 

Approximately 1 in 6 (16%) people in the US had H1N1, and it killed under 13,000 people.  That’s roughly in line with any standard flu.  Approximately 1 in 50 people (2%, and I’m rounding up) has had COVID-19, and it has killed 172,000 people (I’m rounding down).  

 

Let’s recap.  COVID-19 has affected 1/8 the people of H1N1 and has killed 13 times the number of people of H1N1.  You’d have to be willfully stupid to consider this a government conspiracy.  Is it politicized?  Of course.  Are people worrying needlessly?  Of course!  But my goodness, intelligence seems to have left the building in 2020.

Loss of intelligence is growing at an exponential rate this year.

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8 hours ago, Single A west said:

COVID-19 and Children
The best available evidence indicates that COVID-19 poses relatively low risks to school-aged children. Children appear to be at lower risk for contracting COVID-19 compared to adults. To put this in perspective, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as of July 17, 2020, the United States reported that children and adolescents under 18 years old account for under 7 percent of COVID-19 cases and less than 0.1 percent of COVID-19-related deaths.[5] Although relatively rare, flu-related deaths in children occur every year. From 2004-2005 to 2018-2019, flu-related deaths in children reported to CDC during regular flu seasons ranged from 37 to 187 deaths. During the H1N1pandemic (April 15, 2009 to October 2, 2010), 358 pediatric deaths were reported to CDC. So far in this pandemic, deaths of children are less than in each of the last five flu seasons, with only 64.† Additionally, some children with certain underlying medical conditions, however, are at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19.*

Scientific studies suggest that COVID-19 transmission among children in schools may be low. International studies that have assessed how readily COVID-19 spreads in schools also reveal low rates of transmission when community transmission is low. Based on current data, the rate of infection among younger school children, and from students to teachers, has been low, especially if proper precautions are followed. There have also been few reports of children being the primary source of COVID-19 transmission among family members.[6],[7],[8] This is consistent with data from both virus and antibody testing, suggesting that children are not the primary drivers of COVID-19 spread in schools or in the community.[9],[10],[11] No studies are conclusive, but the available evidence provides reason to believe that in-person schooling is in the best interest of students, particularly in the context of appropriate mitigation measures similar to those implemented at essential workplaces

as u see 358 pediatric deaths H1N1, 2009-10, do you remember schools closing or any sports stoppage?

It’s not as big an issue of the kids getting it. 
 

Make no mistake. Kids will get it as they go back. They already have in states that have already started school. It will spread among children. 
 

Is it as deadly? Not compared to other groups, no. But you have to look past the school and go to the home. Those kids who get it, maybe they live with Grandparents because the parents died in a car crash. Maybe the parents themselves are older. Those kids are going to bring it home. Those parents/grandparents — who have been vigilant and safe for 5 months by wearing masks, staying inside and following the guidelines that WORK — and now they are sick and die. All because of another family who didn’t follow those guidelines and sent their kid to school with the virus and infected countless others.

It’s the same argument about sports. It’s NOT about the players getting it. They will. And they’ll recover. But it’s about the families they go home to. And the fans that sit in those stands if you open them back up. 
 

Stop looking at the micro and look at the macro. It’s not an easy decision to make school virtual. I understand that. Believe me. My wife and I, along with my stepson’s father and stepmother, had some real discussion for weeks before we decided to make him 100% virtual for the entire school year. It will likely hurt him in the short run academically. It’s something we are going to work hard to mitigate. But at the end of the day, is it worth sending him back for him to potentially get it and bring it home to his mother who won’t survive the virus? 
 

It’s never as easy as “go or no.”

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I don't bother trying to discuss anything even remotely political anymore, and these days, that's nearly everything, because I found myself making everyone mad. No political party has a monopoly on ignorance.

If Republicans passed a resolution that the sky was blue, Democrats would oppose it, and if Democrats passed a resolution that grass was green, Republicans would oppose that.

I miss the days when people did what was right, NOT what is right for THEM.

If people are so stubborn/ignorant that they will not believe the very truth that is before them because it doesn't align with their private "reality", then that only leaves us with a cleaner gene pool.

Might be harsh, but you can't fix stupid.

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12 hours ago, Ryan4VT said:

It’s not as big an issue of the kids getting it. 
 

Make no mistake. Kids will get it as they go back. They already have in states that have already started school. It will spread among children. 
 

Is it as deadly? Not compared to other groups, no. But you have to look past the school and go to the home. Those kids who get it, maybe they live with Grandparents because the parents died in a car crash. Maybe the parents themselves are older. Those kids are going to bring it home. Those parents/grandparents — who have been vigilant and safe for 5 months by wearing masks, staying inside and following the guidelines that WORK — and now they are sick and die. All because of another family who didn’t follow those guidelines and sent their kid to school with the virus and infected countless others.

It’s the same argument about sports. It’s NOT about the players getting it. They will. And they’ll recover. But it’s about the families they go home to. And the fans that sit in those stands if you open them back up. 
 

Stop looking at the micro and look at the macro. It’s not an easy decision to make school virtual. I understand that. Believe me. My wife and I, along with my stepson’s father and stepmother, had some real discussion for weeks before we decided to make him 100% virtual for the entire school year. It will likely hurt him in the short run academically. It’s something we are going to work hard to mitigate. But at the end of the day, is it worth sending him back for him to potentially get it and bring it home to his mother who won’t survive the virus? 
 

It’s never as easy as “go or no.”

I will tend to disagree with this point as a one size fits all.  There are some that need the in person attention.  Others that are focused can actually use this to their advantage as no distractions to them in the day to day school happenings.  I think a lot of it will have to do with the structure of the virtual leaning.  It's new for many and there is an adjustment to that.  Homeschoolers have been doing this successfully for years as one option.  Again it takes focus and discipline.

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On 8/19/2020 at 3:31 PM, UVAObserver said:

For the 742nd time...

 

Approximately 1 in 6 (16%) people in the US had H1N1, and it killed under 13,000 people.  That’s roughly in line with any standard flu.  Approximately 1 in 50 people (2%, and I’m rounding up) has had COVID-19, and it has killed 172,000 people (I’m rounding down).  

 

Let’s recap.  COVID-19 has affected 1/8 the people of H1N1 and has killed 13 times the number of people of H1N1.  You’d have to be willfully stupid to consider this a government conspiracy.  Is it politicized?  Of course.  Are people worrying needlessly?  Of course!  But my goodness, intelligence seems to have left the building in 2020.

Yes these statistics are very true, however, the situation and narratives are a lot different. H1N1 occured during the middle of a presidency and the republicans weren't fighting tooth and nail to get rid of Obama, the Demorats have tried every way possible to get rid of Trump, then this in an election year. Yes, 13,000 people died out of the millions infected with H1N1, but how many more died that were labeled as deaths related to heart disease, pneumonia, diabetic, etc. This illness has numerous deaths that in no way should have been linked to Covid, while heart disease, pneumonia, diabetic, etc have all declined this year. So we have all of a sudden found ways to help lower those death rates, it is a miracle. You can spin the narrative however you want it to, donkey or elephant, but the fact remains these numbers aren't true and this is an over publicized case of the flu to create mass media hysteria. I know people who have went to have the test performed, backed out after getting in and seeing the swab, yet still got a positive test result with no swab. I know of car accidents and heart attacks, where people had previously had covid, but didn't when they died, yet it is still labeled a covid death. Believe what you want, look at a map and blue states are the ones not playing and red states are for the most part. 

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9 hours ago, stu_bean said:

I will tend to disagree with this point as a one size fits all.  There are some that need the in person attention.  Others that are focused can actually use this to their advantage as no distractions to them in the day to day school happenings.  I think a lot of it will have to do with the structure of the virtual leaning.  It's new for many and there is an adjustment to that.  Homeschoolers have been doing this successfully for years as one option.  Again it takes focus and discipline.

I agree with that. There are certainly those who will thrive in this scenario. Unfortunately, I don’t believe my stepson is one of those. He’s very easily distracted and we will have to work to keep him on task. 

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Covid19 is more than serious.  It's the real deal.  There's no question about it.  I have had it, so I can attest to it personally.  We are trying to go by science and it's important to go by science IN ALL facets of any argument or debate or discussion about C-19 from start to finish.  For example, we have several pieces of sound data above in this thread giving numbers about C-19 that are accurate and there's no question, any thought stating it's not very serious or is fake is just absurd.  We have scientific data, metrics, and more to support this point.  With this written, lets CONTINUE with the scientific viewpoint.  We also have data suggesting throughout history that many, many contagious and serious illnesses for some reason or another (be it Darwinian selection or Divine intervention) children DO NOT transmit very well do adults.  From smallpox to Ebola to the Spanish Flu, and to even chicken pox (yes, an adult who has never had chicken pox can be around a child who has it and remarkably, the adult usually and somehow doesn't get it.)  Of course today, we have a vaccine for this as well. 

Anyway and historically, it is certainly possibly and it happens, children can surely transmit serious and contagious illnesses to adults, but it is overwhelmingly LOW in chance.  We have theories why, but still aren't completely sure.  With all of the above written, we have very, very, very little data so far on C-19's ability to transmit/infect from a child to an adult or more important and vulnerable, a transmission from a child to an elderly adult who likely has co-morbidiities.  Of the anecdotal data we have with C-19, and it's only anecdotal so far, it's becoming very clear that children are very unlikely to transmit the virus to adults.  Yes, it's possible and it's easy to cherry pick the one case in Iowa or Colorado where the kid gave it to 5 adults, etc ) but it's absolutely the exception to the rule.  The media has been and continues to beg for, to actively seek out, to look for this scenario and has been doing so for months, and they are turning up empty 99% of the time.  One theory is that the immune response is so overwhelmingly powerful in children that the virus is weakened to the point that the overall "viral load" in the child is so rapidly decreased that sheer volume of virus around an adult or other child is greatly limited.  Because of this, I am in fact, very much in favor of ALL schools opening and returning in class.  With that written, when I say all schools, I am talking about Pre-K through 8th grade.  I would be in favor of High Schools returning only with mandatory mask policy and would prefer a mixed curriculum of 2 or 3 days in school and 2 or 3 days online.  With colleges, I would halt all public attendance until December.  This is only my opinion, and yes, as you may suspect, I am in the medical field and have Dr as one of my credentials.  It's also how I contracted the illness months ago.  If we are going to argue scientific data to support an argument (a good thing) then we need to stay with that data or lack thereof when arguing the entire argument, from start to finish.  The data in my opinion is far, far in favor of returning pre K kids through 8th grade to school, and in High School, its tricky, it's 50-50.  

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Volunteer firefighter gave me some information on a group of employees in Blacksburg that had been tested for antibodies 22 of 28 tested positive. Trying to get more info and data if at all possible. If you start adding numbers like that and model them into actual cases and recovered(which VDH will not post) that would change everything because I believe the actual deaths have been inflated.

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1 hour ago, Single A west said:

Volunteer firefighter gave me some information on a group of employees in Blacksburg that had been tested for antibodies 22 of 28 tested positive. Trying to get more info and data if at all possible. If you start adding numbers like that and model them into actual cases and recovered(which VDH will not post) that would change everything because I believe the actual deaths have been inflated.

We're also starting to learn that having the antibodies and having COVID will give you immunity for about 3 months. If that's the case, we will need a vaccine or something similar to a Z-pack that will help those who get it and would normally be very sick -- beat it more easily. That's gonna be the key to getting back to a semblance of normal life.

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5 hours ago, Ryan4VT said:

We're also starting to learn that having the antibodies and having COVID will give you immunity for about 3 months. If that's the case, we will need a vaccine or something similar to a Z-pack that will help those who get it and would normally be very sick -- beat it more easily. That's gonna be the key to getting back to a semblance of normal life.

We’re also learning that T-cells and B-cells are much more important for immunoresponse than antibodies.

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12 minutes ago, UVAObserver said:

We’re also learning that T-cells and B-cells are much more important for immunoresponse than antibodies.

All of this means that we are in month 6 of a long, long pandemic and we still don't have a clue what we are doing lol.

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4 hours ago, Ryan4VT said:

All of this means that we are in month 6 of a long, long pandemic and we still don't have a clue what we are doing lol.

Society's getting a glimpse of how science works when science has to be done "on the fly".  Unfortunately, scientists (aided by the media) have done a pretty miserable job of stating things as ironclad facts when, in fact, it's merely preliminary results of scientific testing.  

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1 hour ago, Tigerman10 said:

The rapid saliva test is the key. If we can test cheaply and quickly, then we can identify asymptomatic and presymptomatic carriers and reduce clusters.  
 

 

Agreed. Fast, cheap testing is the key. If we can know in hours instead of weeks, we can make a huge dent. 

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Being in healthcare for 33+ years the one thing I can say for sure is you cannot stop a highly contagious virus. No paper or cloth mask or amount of social distancing is going to stop us from getting it. You will either get it and not know you had it, get it and be sick for awhile, get it and die, or hopefully be lucky enough to not be exposed. 

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When C-19 tips....it will tip fast. What I'm saying is, once the Herd is reached, the virus will plummet as fast as it arrived.  I think the Herd threshold will be reached before the vaccine reaches the market on the U.S. That's good and bad. It's good in the fact that the virus will dissipate, but it's bad for the here and now as in....it's that contagious. 

 

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1 hour ago, 1inStripes said:

So what does everyone think of Monday Night Football in February 22nd?   That will be everyone's first official play date for the VHSL.  Following that most likely playing on Saturday of the same week for game 2.

I’ll go if they play at 2:38 am on a Sunday if that’s when they plan it lol. 

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1 hour ago, 1inStripes said:

So what does everyone think of Monday Night Football in February 22nd?   That will be everyone's first official play date for the VHSL.  Following that most likely playing on Saturday of the same week for game 2.

I would be floored if the games weren’t in the daytime on Saturdays.  If y’all want to freeze your manhood off in the 0 degree weather that comes with a February evening, knock yourselves out!

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2 hours ago, redtiger said:

Im hoping for Saturday day games, but if its Friday nights then its Friday nights. 

I just want to play I could care less when or where. The sooner we stop running scared the better! I have a feeling playing in cold is going to bring back the old school hard nose football you love!

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2 hours ago, redtiger said:

Im hoping for Saturday day games, but if its Friday nights then its Friday nights. 

I understand but I hate Saturday high school football...except semis and state championship which you know before the season it will be on Saturday

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